Annie's "Feast of Trumpets" Page

Also known as Rosh Hashana is September 19th, 2009
And officially starts at sunset on September 18th, 2009
~Remember, all
Jewish holidays begin at sundown on the night before~


"Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, in the
first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of
blowing of
trumpets, an holy convocation."
~Leviticus 23:24"

"And in the seventh month, on the first day of the month,
ye shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work:
it is a day of blowing the
trumpets unto you."
~Numbers 29:1~

The Jewish New Year, called Rosh Hashana, is sometimes called the "feast of the trumpets." It starts on the first day of the month of Tishri, which may begin any time from September 6 to October 5. The celebration lasts for 48 hours
but ushers in a ten-day period of penitence known as "The Days of Awe".
~Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia Deluxe 1998~

Questions & Answers about
The Feast of Trumpets & Rosh Hashanah:

Rosh Ha-Shanah, pronounced rohsh hah SHAH nah or pronounced rohsh hah shah NAH, is the Jewish New Year celebration. The Hebrew words Rosh Ha-Shanah (which are also written Rosh Hashanah) mean Beginning of the Year. During this solemn religious festival, Jews pray for God's forgiveness, for a good year, and for long life. Rosh Ha-Shanah usually begins in September, on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishri, and lasts two days. Some Reform Jews celebrate it for one day.

Rosh Ha-Shanah begins the Ten Days of Penitence, which end on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. Jews believe Rosh Ha-Shanah is the beginning of God's annual judgment of humanity. At that time, God decides who will continue to live and who will die during the coming year. ~Source World Book Encyclopedia~

When is it celebrated?

On the first day of the seventh month of the Jewish Calendar.
Remember, all Jewish holidays begin at sundown on the night before!

This year 2003 or 5763/5764 Rosh Hashanah begins at sunset September 19th, 2009.
For all the dates of the different Jewish:
Annie's "Jewish Calendar Dates for 5763" Page
Annie's "Jewish Calendar Dates for 5764" Page

How is Rosh Hashanah really spelt?
I have seen about 3 spellings of the feast. You can see on this page that even the different encyclopedias that I used for research spelt it differently.

Here is what Webster's Dictionary says: Rosh Hashanah n : a solemn Jewish fast day celebrated on the 1st or 1st and 2nd of Tishri; noted for the blowing of the shofar [syn: {Rosh Hashanah}, {Rosh Hashana}, {Rosh Hashonah}, {Rosh Hashona}, {Jewish New Year}]

What is the seventh month?
Tishri.
- 30 days; Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur fall during this month; regarded as birth month of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; zodiacal sign is the scales, symbolizing the weighing of one's deeds between New Year and Day of Atonement.
~From Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia~

What does Tishri mean?

Ethanim -(Incessant Rain) or Tishri

"And all the men of Israel assembled themselves unto king Solomon
at the feast in the month Ethanim, which is the seventh month."
~1 Kings 8:2~

Easton's Bible Dictionary:
Tishri -
the first month of the civil year, and the seventh of the ecclesiastical year. (1 Kings 8:2). Called in the Assyrian inscriptions Tasaritu, i.e. "beginning."
Ethanim - the month of gifts, i.e., of vintage offerings; called Tishri after the Exile; corresponding to part of September and October. It was the first month of the civil year, and the seventh of the sacred year (1 Kings 8:2).

What does Ethanim mean?
Naves Topical Bible says this about Ethanim the 7th month of the Jewish Calendar:

Ethanim (October) - 1 Kings 8:2
Feasts held in:
Leviticus 23:24,27; Nehemiah 8:13-15
1. Feast of Trumpets in
Leviticus 23:23-25
2. Day of Atonement, on the tenth day of
Leviticus 23:26-32
3. Feast of Tabernacles in
Leviticus 23:33-43
* Jubilee proclaimed in & on the 10th day
Leviticus 25:9
* Solomon's temple dedicated in
1 Kings 8:2
* Altar rebuilt and offerings renewed in after captivity
Ezra 3:1,6

You can just copy and paste any scripture reference and look it up here.
It will open up in a new window.

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When does The Feast of Trumpets fall? 2009 - Sept 10th
Visit
Today's Hebrew Date to find out the date today in the Hebrew Calendar.
The feast is a two day celebration and starts at sundown on the 6th.

Has it been fulfilled literally yet? no
Will it be literally fulfilled? yes
There are 7 feasts and 4 have already been literally fulfilled. Since the first 4 have been fulfilled then it would be logical that the other 3 will be.

Does any one know when? NO
Even though we don't know which year the Feast of Trumpets will be fulfilled we do know that it will be literally fulfilled. So we can be looking, watching and waiting every fall. Maybe it could be this year.

What does the Bible say about the Feast of Trumpets?

Here is what Naves Topical Bible tells us about the
FEAST OF TRUMPETS:
When and how observed
Leviticus 23:24,25; Numbers 29:1-6
Celebrated after the captivity with joy
Nehemiah 8:2,9-12

Here is what Smith's Bible Dictionary tells us about
The Feast of Trumpets,
(Numbers 29:1; Leviticus 23:24) the feast of the new moon, which fell on the first of Tisri. It differed from the ordinary festivals of the new moon in several important particulars. It was one of the seven days of holy convocation. Instead of the mere blowing of the trumpets of the temple at the time of the offering of the sacrifices, it was "a day of blowing of trumpets." In addition to the daily sacrifices and the eleven victims offered on the first of every month, there were offered a young bullock, a ram and seven lambs of the first year, with the accustomed meat offerings, and a kid for a sin offering. (Numbers 29:1-6) The regular monthly offering was thus repeated, with the exception of the young bullock. It has been conjectured that (Psalms 81:1) ... one of the songs of Asaph, was composed expressly for the Feast of Trumpets. The psalm is used in the service for the day by the modern Jews. Various meanings have been assigned to the Feast of Trumpets; but there seems to be no sufficient reason to call in question the common opinion of Jews and Christians, that if was the festival of the New Year’s day of the civil year, the first of Tisri, the month which commenced the sabbatical year and the year of jubilee.

The Easton's Bible Dictionary tells us this about
The Feast of Trumpets,
was celebrated at the beginning of the month Tisri, the first month of the civil year. It received its name from the circumstances that the trumpets usually blown at the commencement of each month were on that occasion blown with unusual solemnity (Lev. 23:23-25; Num. 10:10; 29:1-6). It was one of the seven days of holy convocation. The special design of this feast, which is described in these verses, is not known.

What NT Scripture verses refer to the feast? 1 Cor 4:17 & 1 Thes 4:17

Religious Year --- 7
Civil Year --- 1
Hebrew Month --- Tishri
Western Correlation --- September/ October
Farm Seasons --- Ploughing
Climate --- Dry Season
Special Days: 1st-New Year; 10th-Day of Atonement & 15th-21st - Feast of Tabernacles
~Above From Chronological & Background Charts of the Old Testament by John H. Walton~

Smith's Bible Dictionary says: Feast of Trumpets,
(Numbers 29:1; Leviticus 23:24) the feast of the new moon, which fell on the first of Tishri. It differed from the ordinary festivals of the new moon in several important particulars. It was one of the seven days of holy convocation. Instead of the mere blowing of the trumpets of the temple at the time of the offering of the sacrifices, it was "a day of blowing of trumpets." In addition to the daily sacrifices and the eleven victims offered on the first of every month, there were offered a young bullock, a ram and seven lambs of the first year, with the accustomed meat offerings, and a kid for a sin offering. (Numbers 29:1-6) The regular monthly offering was thus repeated, with the exception of the young bullock. It has been conjectured that (Psalms 81:1) ... one of the songs of Asaph, was composed expressly for the Feast of Trumpets. The psalm is used in the service for the day by the modern Jews. Various meanings have been assigned to the Feast of Trumpets; but there seems to be no sufficient reason to call in question the common opinion of Jews and Christians, that if was the festival of the New Year's day of the civil year, the first of Tishri, the month which commenced the sabbatical year and the year of jubilee.

Did Jesus & the Disciples observe the Biblical Feasts? YES

Observed by:

Torrey's Topical Textbook tells us about
The Feasts of Trumpets,

Easton's Bible Dictionary says this about the: Feast of Trumpets
was celebrated at the beginning of the month Tishri, the first month of the civil year. It received its name from the circumstances that the trumpets usually blown at the commencement of each month were on that occasion blown with unusual solemnity (Lev. 23:23-25; Num. 10:10; 29:1-6). It was one of the seven days of holy convocation. The special design of this feast, which is described in these verses, is not known.

What is the significance of The Feast of Trumpets falling on a Sabbath?
The Sabbath in Judaism is the seventh day of the week, Saturday, which is a holy day of rest. The Sabbath begins at sundown on Friday and ends at nightfall Saturday, at the time when it is calculated that three stars can be seen in the evening sky. On the Sabbath, Jews attend worship services in the synagogue and have special meals at home. Orthodox Jews do not work, travel, or carry money on the Sabbath.

Isn't there a verse that mentions the "last trump"?
Yes there is just one.
"In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the
last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed."
~1 Corinthians 15:52~

Lets look at what the Psalms tells us about the feast:
"Blow the trumpet at the new moon, At the full moon, on our feast day. For it is a statute for Israel, An ordinance of the God of Jacob."
Psalm 81:3-4

Is Rosh Hashanah the same as the Feast of Trumpets?
The World Book Encyclopedia tells us that:
Rosh Ha-Shanah, pronounced rohsh hah SHAH nah or pronounced rohsh hah shah NAH, is the Jewish New Year celebration. The Hebrew words Rosh Ha-Shanah (which are also written Rosh Hashanah) mean Beginning of the Year. During this solemn religious festival, Jews pray for God's forgiveness, for a good year, and for long life. Rosh Ha-Shanah usually begins in September, on the first day of the Hebrew month of Tishri, and lasts two days. Some Reform Jews celebrate it for one day.

Rosh Ha-Shanah begins the Ten Days of Penitence, which end on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement (YOM KIPPUR). Jews believe Rosh Ha-Shanah is the beginning of God's annual judgment of humanity. At that time, God decides who will continue to live and who will die during the coming year.

Jews attend synagogue services on Rosh Ha-Shanah. These services emphasize the themes of judgment, penitence, and forgiveness. A ram's horn, called a shofar, is blown to call the people to repentance and to awaken the Jews to the service of God. Three special groups of prayers are recited during the holiday. The first group reminds the people that God rules the world. The second group tells them that God responds to the sound of the shofar, and the third group that He remembers people's deeds.

What are the High Feasts and Festivals of Judaism?

In Judaism, the most sacred festivals are Rosh Ha-Shanah, the Jewish New Year; and Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. According to Jewish tradition, people are judged on Rosh Ha-Shanah for their deeds of the past year. On Yom Kippur, Jews fast, express their regret for past sins, and declare their hope to perform good deeds during the coming year.

Many Jewish festivals commemorate major events in Jewish history. For example, Passover celebrates the Exodus of the Jews from Egypt. Hanukkah is a celebration of a Jewish victory over the Syrians in 165 BC. Purim honors the rescue of the Jews of Persia (now Iran) from a plot to kill them. Jews celebrate these festivals both in synagogues and at home.
~Source for above is The World Book Encyclopedia~
Related Link: Learn how to: Make Amends Between the High Holidays


Here is what "Ask the Rabbi" Website
says about Rosh Hashanah:

Dear Rabbi, Could you email me a brief description of Rosh Hashana? I would like to use it for my web page.

Dear David, The first day of Tishrei is called "a day of shofar blasting" (Numbers 29:1). Our oral tradition tells us that this day marks the anniversary of the creation of the world. Hence it is the day when, every year, G-d "takes stock" of Creation, judging our actions. Thus, we call it Rosh Hashana, the "Head" of the Year; for just as the head directs the body, so too, G-d's judgment on Rosh Hashana directs the events of the coming year.

Rosh Hashana is a two-day festival which we honor and enjoy with special (new) clothing and festive meals. There is a prohibition against certain types of work. We light holiday candles and recite kiddush over wine. We eat sweet apples dipped in honey, in prayer that we merit a good, sweet year. The highlight of the daily prayer service is the sounding of the shofar, the ram's horn.

For more, see Ohr Somayach Interactive, our web site, particularly the following: http://www.ohr.org.il/special/roshhash/index.htm. There's lot's there. Feel free to link your site to as many articles and features as you like.

Why are apples and honey eaten on this feast day?

Apples and Honey - On Rosh Hashanah, apples are dipped in honey. It is done in the hopes that the New Year will be as sweet as the taste of these fine foods.

Why is honey Kosher? from "Ask the Rabbi"
Here is a recipe for you:
"Honey cake for Rosh Hashana"

Rosh Hashanah Recipes

I have not tried these recipes but thought you might enjoy checking them out.
Auntie Rivka's Rosh Hashannah Flank Steak from Empire Kosher
Auntie Rivka's Never Fail Challah for Rosh Hashanah
Honey And Almond Cake For A Rosh Hashannah Dessert
Empire Kosher's Recipe Indes Page
JTN's
Library of Recipes

Rosh Hashanah Customs
Special foods are eaten to signify different things. They symbolize sweetness, blessings, and abundance.
For more information visit:
Various Customs of Rosh HaShanah

What is the Torah reading for this special day?

Torah Readings for Rosh Hashana are:
Ishamael and Hagar: Genesis 21:1-21 & The Akeida: Genesis 22:1-19


Is there a Synagogue Service?
The World Book Encyclopedia says that Jews attend synagogue services on Rosh Ha-Shanah. These services emphasize the themes of judgment, penitence, and forgiveness. A ram's horn, called a shofar, is blown to call the people to repentance and to awaken the Jews to the service of God. Three special groups of prayers are recited during the holiday. The first group reminds the people that God rules the world. The second group tells them that God responds to the sound of the shofar, and the third group that He remembers people's deeds. Psalm 24 is one of the passages read during the service.
Related Link: Learn how to: Choose a Synagogue

What are the "High Holidays"?
The High Holidays, called Rosh Ha-Shanah and Yom Kippur, are the most sacred days of the Jewish year.
Like all Jewish holidays, they occur on different dates each year because they are based on the Hebrew
calendar. The High Holidays come during Tishri, the first month of the Hebrew calendar, which
usually falls in September or October. (See
Annie's New Years Page to learn about the Jewish Calendar)

Rosh Ha-Shanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on the first day of Tishri and lasts two days. It celebrates the
creation of the world and God's rule over it. According to Jewish tradition, people are judged on Rosh
Ha-Shanah for their deeds of the past year. The chief symbol is the shofar,
a ram's horn that is sounded during the holiday worship.

Rosh Ha-Shanah begins the Ten Days of Penitence, which end on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
On Yom Kippur, Jews fast and express their regret for bad deeds during the past year and their hope
to perform good deeds in the coming year. The day is observed mainly through synagogue worship.
~Source Encarta Encyclopedia~

The High Holidays, called Rosh Ha-Shanah and Yom Kippur, are the most sacred days of the Jewish year.
Like all Jewish holidays, they occur on different dates each year because they are based on the Hebrew
calendar. The High Holidays come during Tishri, the first month of the Hebrew calendar,
which usually falls in September or October.

Rosh Ha-Shanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on the first day of Tishri and lasts two days. It celebrates
the creation of the world and God's rule over it. According to Jewish tradition, people are judged
on Rosh Ha-Shanah for their deeds of the past year. The chief symbol is the shofar, a ram's horn that
is sounded during the holiday worship. ~Source for above is The World Book Encyclopedia~

More about Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew, "beginning of the year"), Jewish New Year, celebrated on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri (falling in September or October) by Orthodox and Conservative Jews outside Israel and on the first day alone by Reform Jews and Israeli Jews. It begins the observance of the Ten Penitential Days, a period ending with Yom Kippur that is the most solemn of the Jewish calendar. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known as the High Holy Days.

In the Bible, Rosh Hashanah is mentioned only as a day of remembrance and of the sounding of the ram's horn. These two characteristics of the day, interwoven with the theme of the proclamation of God's kingship, became the major components of the New Year's observance in later Judaism. They are emphasized in the liturgy by the repetition of "verses of remembrance," "verses that mention the ram's horn," and "sovereignty verses." The first of these is important because it represents the sense of continuing creation and development of the world that Judaism emphasizes on this anniversary of creation. Because good and evil actions greatly influence the future, it is emphasized that God "remembers," and mention is made of the meritorious acts of the Hebrew patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to urge emulation of their holiness as the path to redemption.

Indeed, the most prominent scriptural passage in the Rosh Hashanah liturgy is that of the binding of Isaac (see Genesis 22), which forms the portion from the Torah designated for reading on that day. This passage leads into the theme of the ram's horn; in the service in the synagogue the shofar, a wind instrument made of ram's horn to represent the horn of the animal sacrificed in Isaac's stead, is blown. Early peoples often made noise at the New Year to drive away demons; the Jews transformed this practice into a blowing of the horn to prefigure the moment when God would destroy the evil in the world, "blow the ram's horn, and come with the whirlwinds." At that moment, it is held in the "sovereignty verses," God will be king over all the earth, as he is now king over those who accept him in a renewal of commitment on Rosh Hashanah. ~Source Encarta Encyclopedia~

Christian & Messianic Feast of Trumpets Links:

FEAST OF TRUMPETS by Hebraic Heritage Ministries International
Daily Bible Study
Feast of Trumpets
Koinonia House -- Feast of Trumpets Article
ROSH HASHANA- The Feast of Trumpets (Jewish New Year)

Jewish Feast of Trumpets/Rosh Hashanah Links:
Rosh Hashanah Q&A
OU.ORG presents Rosh HaShanah
Rosh HaShana - The Jewish New Year
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur - Lots of great resources
Learn how to:
Observe Rosh Hashana

This is just a beginning for you and your study about The Feast of Trumpets. Grab a notebook and
your
Bible Study Tools. Look up and read all the verses with trumpets in them. To consider the feasts
of the Bible in regards to prophecy visit:
Annie's Feasts of the Bible Page. Remember that this
is one of the feasts that has not been fulfilled literally.

The time is so very short. Remember that we are to be found faithful and watching for the
Lord's return. Seek the Lord while He may be found. Continue to pray and read the scriptures.
God still speaks to us today. Listen for His still small voice.

"And it shall come to pass in that day, that the great trumpet shall be blown,
and they shall come which were ready to perish in the land of Assyria,
and the outcasts in the land of Egypt, and shall worship
the LORD in the holy mount at Jerusalem."
~Isaiah 27:13~

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Other Related Pages by Annie:

Annie's Feasts of the Bible Page
Annie's Shofar & Trumpet Page
Annie's List of Feasts of the Bible Pages
Annie's "Jewish Calendar Dates for 5766" Page
Annie's 2008 Holidays By Date Page
Jakes "Hebrew Holidays Puzzle" Page

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